Phenomenology is a philosophical approach that focuses on the study of subjective experiences and consciousness. It has its roots in the works of philosophers such as Immanuel Kant, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, and Edmund Husserl. However, the person who first used the term “phenomenology” was a German philosopher named Johann Heinrich Lambert.

Lambert was born in 1728 in Mulhouse, France, and is considered one of the most important philosophers of the 18th century. Lambert was interested in various fields of study, including mathematics, physics, philosophy, and astronomy. He wrote several books on these subjects and is best known for his book “Neues Organon,” which he published in 1764.

In this book, Lambert used the term “phenomenology” to describe a method of studying phenomena. He defined phenomenology as “the science of appearances,” which means that it focuses on how things appear to us rather than how they are in themselves.

Lambert’s use of the term “phenomenology” was not related to Husserl’s later use of the term. Husserl developed his own version of phenomenology in the early 20th century and used the term to describe his philosophical approach.

Husserl’s phenomenology focused on studying consciousness and subjective experiences. He believed that by analyzing our experiences and perceptions, we could gain insights into the nature of reality.

Husserl’s phenomenology had a significant impact on philosophy and influenced many other philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Jean-Paul Sartre.

In summary, Johann Heinrich Lambert was the first person to use the term “phenomenology.” However, his use of the term was different from Husserl’s later use. While Lambert used it to describe a method for studying phenomena based on appearance, Husserl developed his own version of phenomenology, which focused on studying consciousness and subjective experiences.