Unilinear evolution is a theory that suggests the development of societies from primitive to complex levels. It is based on the idea that all cultures progress through similar stages of development. This theory has been attributed to several scholars, but one person stands out as the primary developer of the theory.

Lewis Henry Morgan, an American anthropologist, is credited with developing the theory of unilinear evolution. He was born in 1818 in New York and became interested in studying Native American cultures. Through his work, he developed a framework for understanding how societies evolve over time.

Morgan’s theory of unilinear evolution was based on the idea that all societies progress through three stages: savagery, barbarism, and civilization. Each stage was characterized by specific features such as technological advancements, social organization, and cultural practices.

During the savagery stage, which was further divided into lower and upper savagery, humans relied on hunting and gathering for survival. In the barbarism stage, humans began to develop agriculture and animal husbandry. Finally, in civilization stage, humans developed complex systems of government and technology.

Morgan’s work had a significant impact on anthropology as a discipline. His theories inspired other scholars to study human cultures from an evolutionary perspective. However, it is important to note that his theories have been criticized for being Eurocentric and for oversimplifying complex cultural processes.

Despite these criticisms, Morgan’s contributions to anthropology have had a lasting impact on our understanding of human societies. Today, anthropologists continue to study cultural change and evolution using frameworks inspired by Morgan’s work.

In conclusion, Lewis Henry Morgan is recognized as the primary developer of the theory of unilinear evolution. His work has had a significant impact on anthropology as a discipline and continues to inspire new research today. While his ideas have been criticized for being Eurocentric and oversimplified at times, they represent an important step forward in our understanding of human cultural evolution.