Social Judgment Theory (SJT) is a communication theory that explains how people make judgments about different messages in their social environment. Developed in the late 1950s by Carolyn Sherif, Muzafer Sherif, and Carl Hovland, SJT has been influential in understanding persuasion, attitude change, and social influence.

Carolyn Sherif

Carolyn Sherif was one of the primary developers of SJT. She was born on January 23, 1922, in Peoria, Illinois. She completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Michigan in 1943 and earned her Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University in 1948.

Sherif conducted extensive research on group dynamics and intergroup relations throughout her career. Her work on SJT showed how individuals’ attitudes are shaped by their pre-existing attitudes and beliefs.

Muzafer Sherif

Muzafer Sherif was another key figure in developing SJT. He was born on July 29, 1906, in ─░zmir, Turkey. He received his Ph. from Columbia University in 1935 and later became a professor at the University of Oklahoma.

Sherif conducted several experiments to study social norms and group dynamics. His work showed that individuals tend to conform to group norms when they perceive them as legitimate.

Carl Hovland

Carl Hovland was a psychologist who also played a significant role in developing SJT. He was born on June 12, 1912, in Chicago, Illinois. He earned his Ph. from Yale University in 1936 and later joined the faculty at Yale.

Hovland’s research focused on persuasion and message effects. His work showed that persuasive messages are more effective when they are perceived as credible.

Conclusion

In conclusion, SJT was developed by a team of influential psychologists, including Carolyn Sherif, Muzafer Sherif, and Carl Hovland. Their work on SJT has had a significant impact on the understanding of persuasion and social influence. Understanding SJT can help individuals better understand how they make judgments about different messages in their social environment.