Social Bonding Theory is a popular concept in sociology that explains the importance of social connections and relationships in human society. It suggests that people are more likely to conform to societal norms and laws when they have strong social bonds with others.

But who developed this theory? Let’s take a closer look.

The Social Bonding Theory was first introduced by Travis Hirschi, an American criminologist, in his book titled “Causes of Delinquency” published in 1969. Hirschi argued that social bonding plays a critical role in shaping human behavior and preventing individuals from engaging in criminal activities.

According to Hirschi, there are four main elements of social bonding: attachment, commitment, involvement, and belief. Attachment refers to emotional ties that people form with others, such as family members, friends, or romantic partners.

Commitment refers to an individual’s investment in conventional activities like education or career goals. Involvement refers to the amount of time spent engaging in conventional activities rather than deviant ones. Belief refers to the extent to which individuals accept and internalize societal values and norms.

Hirschi suggested that individuals who have strong social bonds with others are less likely to engage in criminal behavior as they do not want to disappoint or harm their loved ones. Moreover, individuals who are highly committed to conventional activities like education or career goals are less likely to engage in criminal activity as it may jeopardize their future aspirations.

Hirschi’s Social Bonding Theory has been widely used by criminologists and sociologists alike as it provides a framework for understanding how social connections impact human behavior. It has also been used by policymakers and law enforcement agencies to design interventions aimed at reducing crime rates by strengthening social bonds within communities.

In conclusion, Travis Hirschi developed the Social Bonding Theory which proposes that strong social bonds with others prevent individuals from engaging in criminal activities. The four elements of social bonding- attachment, commitment, involvement, and belief- provide a framework for understanding the importance of social connections in shaping human behavior. This theory has been widely used in criminology and sociology and has influenced policy interventions aimed at reducing crime rates.