Social Dominance Theory is a social psychological theory that explains why hierarchy exists and how it is maintained in society. It was first introduced by Jim Sidanius and Felicia Pratto in 1999.

The Creators of Social Dominance Theory

Jim Sidanius is a professor of psychology and African American studies at Harvard University. He has conducted extensive research on intergroup relations, social dominance, and inequality.

Felicia Pratto is a professor of psychology at the University of Connecticut. Her research focuses on the cognitive and motivational underpinnings of prejudice, discrimination, and social dominance.

The Origin of Social Dominance Theory

Social Dominance Theory evolved from earlier theories such as Social Identity Theory, Realistic Conflict Theory, and System Justification Theory. According to Social Dominance Theory, societies are structured around group-based hierarchies that are maintained through institutional practices and individual behaviors.

Key Concepts in Social Dominance Theory

The Importance of Social Dominance Theory

Social Dominance Theory provides a framework for understanding how group-based hierarchies are created and maintained within societies. It has been used to explain a variety of phenomena such as discrimination, prejudice, intergroup conflict, and political attitudes.

Critiques of Social Dominance Theory

Critics argue that Social Dominance Theory does not take into account the role of individual agency and ignores the possibility of social change. Others argue that Social Dominance Theory puts too much emphasis on group-level dynamics and does not adequately address the complexity of intergroup relations.

Conclusion

Social Dominance Theory is a complex theory that helps to explain the existence and maintenance of group-based hierarchies in society. It was created by Jim Sidanius and Felicia Pratto in 1999 and has been used to explain a variety of social phenomena. While it has its critics, Social Dominance Theory remains an important framework for understanding social inequality and intergroup relations.