Social construct theory is a popular concept that explains how societal norms and values are created and maintained. This theory proposes that our perceptions of reality are not objective but rather subjective, as they are shaped by our social interactions and cultural conditioning.

But who created this theory? Let’s take a closer look.

The Origins of Social Construct Theory

The origins of social construct theory can be traced back to the 1960s and 1970s, where it emerged as a prominent perspective in sociology, anthropology, and philosophy. However, it was not until the 1980s that this theory gained widespread recognition.

One of the earliest proponents of social construct theory was Peter L. Berger and Thomas Luckmann, who published their book “The Social Construction of Reality” in 1966. They argued that reality is not an objective fact but rather a product of human interaction. According to them, individuals create shared meanings through their interactions with one another, which lead to the formation of social structures.

Other Influential Thinkers

Another influential thinker who contributed to the development of social construct theory was Michel Foucault. He argued that knowledge is not neutral but rather shaped by power relations within society. Foucault believed that institutions such as schools, prisons, and hospitals played a significant role in shaping our perceptions of reality.

Another notable figure in the development of social construct theory was Judith Butler. She focused on gender identity and argued that gender is not biological but rather a social construction. According to her, gender identities are formed through repeated performances that are reinforced by societal norms and expectations.

Conclusion

In conclusion, social construct theory has had a significant impact on our understanding of how societal norms and values are created and maintained. While there were multiple contributors to its development, Peter L. Berger and Thomas Luckmann were among the first to propose this perspective in their book “The Social Construction of Reality”. Other influential thinkers such as Michel Foucault and Judith Butler also made significant contributions to social construct theory.