The social-cognitive theory of hypnosis asserts that hypnotic experiences are not solely determined by the hypnotist’s suggestions, but also by the expectations and beliefs of the individual being hypnotized. This theory suggests that hypnosis is a collaborative process between the hypnotist and the individual, and that both parties play an active role in creating the hypnotic experience.

According to this theory, individuals who are more suggestible or open to hypnosis are more likely to have a successful hypnotic experience. However, it is important to note that suggestibility is not simply a personality trait; rather, it can be influenced by situational factors such as the individual’s emotional state and level of relaxation.

Another key component of the social-cognitive theory of hypnosis is the idea that individuals can learn to enter into a hypnotic state through repeated exposure to hypnotic inductions. Through this process, individuals can become more familiar with the sensations and experiences associated with hypnosis, thereby making it easier for them to enter into a trance state in future sessions.

Furthermore, this theory suggests that hypnosis is not a distinct state of consciousness, but rather a combination of various cognitive processes such as attentional focus and suggestibility. Hypnotic suggestions are believed to work by altering an individual’s perception of reality rather than inducing any sort of unique or altered state of consciousness.

In conclusion, the social-cognitive theory of hypnosis asserts that hypnotic experiences are shaped by both the suggestions of the hypnotist and the expectations and beliefs of the individual being hypnotized. It emphasizes that hypnosis is a collaborative process and suggests that individuals can learn to become more receptive to hypnosis through repeated exposure.