If you’re a music enthusiast, you might have heard of the term ‘TR’ in music theory. TR, which stands for ‘tonicization of relative chords’, is a significant concept in music theory that enhances the harmonic complexity of a piece of music. In this article, we’ll delve deeper into what TR is and how it functions in music.

What Is TR?

TR, or tonicization of relative chords, refers to the process of emphasizing the relative chord of a key by treating it as a temporary tonic. In simpler terms, TR involves borrowing chords from another key to create a harmonic variation that ultimately resolves back to the original key.

Why Is TR Important?

TR is an essential concept in music theory as it helps composers create variations within their compositions while still adhering to the established tonality. By introducing borrowed chords from another key, composers can add new textures and colors to their compositions, making them more dynamic and engaging.

How Does TR Work?

TR works by temporarily emphasizing a new tonality through borrowed chords. For example, if we are in the key of C major, we can use chords from A minor (which is C major’s relative minor) to create harmonic variation. The A minor chord would become the temporary tonic and would be followed by other chords borrowed from A minor such as E7 or Dm.

Types of TR

There are two primary types of TR – simple and extended. Simple TR involves borrowing just one chord from another key while extended TR involves borrowing multiple chords.

Simple TR

Simple TR is used when composers want to create subtle harmonic variations within their compositions without straying too far from the established tonality. In simple TR, only one chord is borrowed from another key and used as a temporary tonic before resolving back to the original key.

Extended TR

Extended TR is used when composers want to create more significant harmonic variations within their compositions. In extended TR, multiple chords are borrowed from another key and used as temporary tonics before resolving back to the original key.

Conclusion

In conclusion, TR is a significant concept in music theory that allows composers to create harmonic variations within their compositions. By borrowing chords from another key and treating them as temporary tonics, composers can add new textures and colors to their music while still adhering to the established tonality. Whether it’s simple or extended TR, this technique is an excellent tool for any composer looking to add complexity and interest to their music.