The theory of social self is a concept that has been studied extensively in the field of social psychology. It refers to the idea that individuals develop a sense of self through their interactions with others in society. In other words, our sense of self is shaped by the feedback we receive from those around us.

History of Theory of Social Self

The theory of social self was first introduced by psychologist George Herbert Mead in the early 20th century. Mead believed that individuals develop a sense of self by taking on the perspectives and attitudes of others in their environment. He proposed that this process begins in childhood, as children learn to imitate and internalize the behaviors and beliefs of those around them.

Key Components of Theory of Social Self

According to Mead’s theory, there are several key components that contribute to an individual’s sense of social self:

Applications for Theory of Social Self

The theory of social self has several important applications for understanding human behavior:

Conclusion

In conclusion, the theory of social self is a critical concept in the field of social psychology. It provides insight into how individuals develop a sense of self through their interactions with others in society. By understanding the key components of this theory and its applications for understanding human behavior, we can gain a deeper understanding of ourselves and those around us.