Phenomenology and Ethnomethodology are two distinct methods used in social research to study human experiences and actions. While both of these methods have different origins, they share some similarities in terms of how they approach the study of the social world.

Phenomenology is a philosophical method that originated in the early 20th century. It focuses on studying the subjective experiences of individuals, and how these experiences shape their understanding of the world around them. Phenomenologists believe that subjective experiences are the most important aspect of human consciousness, and that by studying these experiences, we can gain a deeper understanding of human behavior.

Ethnomethodology, on the other hand, is a sociological method that emerged in the mid-20th century. It focuses on studying how people make sense of their everyday lives through their interactions with others. Ethnomethodologists believe that social order is created through people’s everyday actions and interactions with each other.

Phenomenology:
Phenomenology is based on the idea that our subjective experiences are complex and multi-layered. It involves a detailed examination of human consciousness and how it interacts with the world around us. Phenomenologists use various techniques to explore these experiences, including introspection, empathy, and bracketing.

Introspection:

Introspection is a technique used by phenomenologists to study subjective experiences. It involves reflecting on one’s own conscious experience and describing it in detail. By doing so, researchers can gain insight into how individuals experience different phenomena.

Empathy:

Empathy involves putting oneself in someone else’s shoes to understand their subjective experience. This technique requires researchers to be open-minded and non-judgmental when listening to others’ stories.

Bracketing:

Bracketing involves setting aside one’s own assumptions and biases when studying subjective experiences. This technique allows researchers to approach their work with an open mind and avoid imposing their own ideas onto the subject.

Ethnomethodology:
Ethnomethodology is based on the idea that social order is created through people’s everyday actions and interactions with each other. Ethnomethodologists study how people make sense of their everyday lives by examining the rules and norms that guide their behavior.

Interaction:

Interaction is a key concept in ethnomethodology. Ethnomethodologists believe that social order is created through people’s interactions with each other. They study how people use language, gestures, and other forms of communication to make sense of their world.

Rules and Norms:

Ethnomethodologists examine the rules and norms that guide people’s behavior in different social contexts. They study how these rules are created, maintained, and changed over time.

Practical Action:

Ethnomethodologists focus on practical action, or the ways in which people go about their daily lives. They examine how people use various resources to solve problems and achieve their goals.

Conclusion:
In conclusion, phenomenology and ethnomethodology are two distinct methods used to study human experiences and actions. While they differ in terms of their origins and techniques, both methods share a common goal of understanding the subjective experiences of individuals. By using these methods, researchers can gain insight into how individuals experience different phenomena and how they make sense of their everyday lives.