What Is Durkheim Theory of Social Solidarity?

//

Diego Sanchez

Émile Durkheim, a French sociologist, is known for his works on social solidarity and its importance in society. Durkheim’s theory of social solidarity explains how societies maintain their coherence and integrity over time. In this article, we will explore Durkheim’s theory of social solidarity in detail.

What Is Social Solidarity?

Social solidarity refers to the bonds that hold individuals together in society. It is the sense of belonging to a group that shares common values, norms, and beliefs. Social solidarity is essential for the smooth functioning of society as it helps individuals cooperate with each other and work towards common goals.

Durkheim’s Theory of Social Solidarity

Durkheim identified two types of social solidarity – mechanical and organic.

Mechanical Solidarity

Mechanical solidarity exists in traditional societies where individuals share similar beliefs, values, and customs. In such societies, there is little division of labor, and everyone performs similar tasks.

The cohesion between individuals comes from their shared beliefs and values. The punishment for violating these beliefs comes from the community itself rather than external authorities.

Organic Solidarity

Organic solidarity exists in modern societies where individuals perform specialized tasks based on their skills and abilities. In such societies, there is a division of labor that leads to interdependence among individuals. The cohesion between individuals comes from their mutual dependency on each other to fulfill their needs.

The Importance of Social Solidarity

Social solidarity is essential for maintaining social order and stability. It helps us understand why people behave the way they do in different contexts. Social solidarity also provides a sense of belonging to individuals who share common values, norms, and beliefs.

Benefits of Social Solidarity

  • Cooperation: When people share common values and beliefs, they are more likely to cooperate with each other. This cooperation leads to the achievement of common goals.
  • Conflict Resolution: Social solidarity helps in resolving conflicts through the shared values and norms of the group.
  • Social Control: Social solidarity creates a sense of responsibility towards others, leading to self-regulation of behavior and adherence to societal norms.

Challenges to Social Solidarity

  • Diversity: In diverse societies, it can be challenging to find common values and beliefs that everyone shares. This can lead to a lack of social cohesion and tension between different groups.
  • Anomie: Anomie refers to a state of normlessness where individuals feel disconnected from society. This can occur in modern societies where there is a lack of shared values and beliefs.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Durkheim’s theory of social solidarity explains how societies maintain their coherence and integrity over time. It highlights the importance of shared values, norms, and beliefs in promoting cooperation, conflict resolution, and social control. Understanding social solidarity is essential for creating a harmonious society that promotes individual well-being and collective progress.