In music theory, intervals refer to the distance between two notes. There are two types of intervals – major and minor. A major interval is defined as the distance between two notes that are seven half-steps apart.

For example, if we take the C major scale and play the first note (C) and the third note (E), we get a major third interval. This is because there are four half-steps between C and E.

Major intervals have a bright and happy sound to them. They are commonly used in music to create uplifting melodies and harmonies. In fact, many popular songs use major intervals extensively.

One of the most common uses of a major interval is in the major chord. A major chord is made up of three notes – the root, the third (a major interval), and the fifth. This chord gives off a sense of happiness and positivity that many people find uplifting.

Another common use of a major interval is in arpeggios. An arpeggio is where you play each note in a chord individually, rather than all at once. When playing an arpeggio using only major intervals, you get a very bright and cheerful sound.

It’s important to note that not all intervals can be classified as either major or minor. There are also augmented and diminished intervals which fall outside this classification system.

In conclusion, a major interval is defined as the distance between two notes that are seven half-steps apart. They have a happy sound to them and are commonly used in music to create uplifting melodies and harmonies. Whether you’re playing chords or arpeggios, understanding major intervals is an essential skill for any musician to have.