Have you ever heard the term “hidden fifths” in music theory? It’s a concept that can be quite confusing for those who are new to music theory, but it’s an important one to understand if you want to become a better musician. In this article, we’ll explain what hidden fifths are, how they work, and why they’re important.

What Are Hidden Fifths?

In music theory, a fifth is an interval between two notes that are seven half-steps apart. For example, the interval between C and G is a fifth.

Hidden fifths occur when two or more voices move in parallel fifths without any other harmonies in between. This can create an unpleasant sound that violates traditional rules of harmony.

Why Are Hidden Fifths Considered Bad?

Hidden fifths are considered bad because they violate traditional rules of harmony. In Western music theory, there are certain guidelines for how notes should be combined to create pleasing sounds. These guidelines are based on centuries of musical tradition and have been developed over time by composers and theorists alike.

When two or more voices move in parallel fifths without any other harmonies in between, it creates a sound that is considered too simple and lacks depth. This violates the traditional rules of harmony and can make the music sound amateurish or unrefined.

How Can You Avoid Hidden Fifths?

To avoid hidden fifths in your compositions or arrangements, there are several strategies you can use:

Conclusion

Hidden fifths can be a tricky concept to understand, but they’re an important one for any musician or composer to know. By avoiding hidden fifths in your compositions or arrangements, you can create more interesting and complex sounds that follow traditional rules of harmony. Remember to use chord inversions, passing tones, and different harmonic progressions to keep your music sounding fresh and engaging.