Cognitive psychology views the computer as a good analogy of the human brain. This is because both the computer and the human brain process information, store memories, and retrieve information when needed. In this article, we will explore how cognitive psychology views the computer as a good analogy of the human brain.

Processing Information

The computer processes information through its central processing unit (CPU), which receives input from various sources such as the keyboard, mouse, and other peripherals. Similarly, the human brain processes information through its neurons, which receive input from various sensory organs such as the eyes, ears, nose, and tongue.

Both the computer and the human brain use algorithms to process information. An algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for solving a problem. In computers, algorithms are used to perform tasks such as sorting data or searching for specific files. In humans, algorithms are used to solve problems such as mathematical equations or finding our way through a new city.

Storing Memories

The computer stores data in its memory chips or hard disk drives for later retrieval. Similarly, the human brain stores memories in different parts of its cortex for later use. Memories can be short-term or long-term depending on their importance and relevance.

Retrieving Information

The computer retrieves information from its memory and presents it to the user through the monitor or other output devices. Similarly, the human brain retrieves information from its stored memories and presents it to us through our thoughts and actions.

Conclusion

In conclusion, cognitive psychology considers the computer to be a good analogy of the human brain as both of them process information, store memories, and retrieve information when needed. While the computer is a man-made machine designed by humans, the human brain is a natural biological organ that has evolved over millions of years. Despite their differences in design and structure, both the computer and the human brain have remarkable similarities in how they function.