If you are a music enthusiast, you might have come across the term ‘slashed 6’ in your studies. A slashed 6 is a notation used in music theory which has many meanings, depending on the context it is used in. In this article, we will take an in-depth look at what a slashed 6 means in music theory.

What is a Slashed 6?

A slashed 6 is represented by the symbol ‘/6’. It indicates that the chord should have its sixth note flattened.

For example, if we take the C major chord (C-E-G), and add a sixth note to it (A), we get the C6 chord (C-E-G-A). If we want to flatten the sixth note of this chord, we would use a slashed 6 and write it as C6/5 or C6/flat5.

Uses of Slashed 6 Chords

Slashed 6 chords are commonly used in jazz and blues music. They add color and depth to the harmony of a song.

For example, in jazz music, you might hear a musician play a C7 chord followed by a C7/flat5 chord. This creates tension and interest in the music.

Substituting Chords with Slashed 6 Chords

Another use of slashed 6 chords is to substitute them for other chords. For example, if we take the A minor chord (A-C-E), we can substitute it with an F major chord (F-A-C) with a slashed 6 to create an A minor sound. The resulting chord would be F/A or F/flat6.

Slashed 6 Chords vs. Slash Chords

It’s important not to confuse slashed 6 chords with slash chords (/ chords). A slash chord refers to a chord where the bass note is different from the root note.

For example, if we take the C major chord (C-E-G) and add a G/B bass note to it, we get a C/G chord. In this case, the slash (/) refers to the bass note.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a slashed 6 is a notation used in music theory that indicates that the sixth note of a chord should be flattened. Slashed 6 chords are commonly used in jazz and blues music and can add color and depth to the harmony of a song.

They can also be used to substitute chords for other chords. It’s important not to confuse slashed 6 chords with slash chords as they have different meanings. With this knowledge, you can now better understand and appreciate the intricacies of music theory.