Cell theory is a fundamental concept in biology that states all living organisms are composed of cells. It has been developed over hundreds of years by scientists and researchers who have studied the structure and function of cells.

The two basic tenets of cell theory are:

All living organisms are composed of one or more cells

This tenet means that every living organism, whether it’s a plant, animal, or microbe, is made up of one or more cells. Cells are the basic building blocks of life. They vary in size and shape but they all have certain basic structures in common.

Cells are the basic unit of life

This tenet means that cells are the smallest unit capable of carrying out all the functions necessary for life. Cells can perform many essential processes such as energy production, waste removal, and reproduction.

These two tenets form the foundation of cell theory. They were first proposed by Matthias Schleiden and Theodor Schwann in 1838-1839. Later on, Rudolf Virchow added a third tenet which stated that all cells arise from pre-existing cells.

The discovery of these tenets has revolutionized our understanding of life on earth. Before this discovery, it was believed that organisms could arise spontaneously from non-living matter. However, cell theory proved that every living organism is made up of one or more cells.

Today, scientists continue to study cells to gain a better understanding of how they work and how they can be used to treat diseases. Modern technology has allowed researchers to study individual cells in great detail which has led to many new discoveries.

In conclusion, cell theory is a fundamental concept in biology that states all living organisms are composed of cells and that cells are the basic unit of life. These two tenets were discovered over hundreds of years by scientists who studied the structure and function of cells. They form the foundation for our understanding of life on earth and have led to many new discoveries.