Is the Social Self Based on George Mead’s Theory?

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Diego Sanchez

The concept of the social self is a fundamental aspect of human interaction and understanding. It refers to how individuals develop a sense of self through their interactions with others and the society they live in. One of the most influential theories in explaining the formation of the social self is George Mead’s theory of symbolic interactionism.

George Mead’s Theory of Symbolic Interactionism

George Herbert Mead was an American philosopher and sociologist who proposed a theory known as symbolic interactionism in the early 20th century. According to Mead, individuals develop a sense of self through social interaction and communication.

Symbolic Interactionism:

Mead’s theory is based on the idea that human beings assign meanings to symbols and use them to interpret and understand their social world. These symbols can be words, gestures, or any other form of meaningful communication.

The Role of Language:

Mead emphasized the significance of language in shaping our understanding of ourselves and others. Through language, individuals are able to communicate their thoughts, feelings, and intentions to others. This process plays a crucial role in developing a sense of self.

Language allows us to:

  • Express our thoughts and emotions: By using words, we can articulate our inner experiences and share them with others.
  • Interpret other people’s actions: Language enables us to understand the meaning behind other people’s behaviors or gestures.
  • Create shared meanings: Through language, individuals can establish shared meanings for certain symbols or concepts, allowing for effective communication within a society.

The Role of Social Interaction:

Mead argued that the development of the social self is closely linked to social interaction. He introduced the concept of the “I” and the “Me” to explain how individuals perceive themselves in relation to others.

The “I”:

The “I” represents an individual’s spontaneous and impulsive actions. It is the part of ourselves that initiates actions based on our personal desires and needs.

The “Me”:

The “Me” refers to the socialized aspect of our self. It is shaped by how others perceive us and the roles we play in society. The “Me” takes into account societal expectations, norms, and values.

Role-Taking:

Mead proposed that role-taking is a crucial process in the formation of the social self. Role-taking involves putting oneself in another person’s shoes and understanding their perspective.

Role-taking allows us to:

  • Anticipate reactions: By understanding how others may react to our actions, we can adjust our behavior accordingly.
  • Develop empathy: Role-taking helps us understand and empathize with others, fostering stronger interpersonal relationships.
  • Internalize societal expectations: Through role-taking, individuals internalize societal norms and values, contributing to their sense of self.

The Influence of George Mead’s Theory on Understanding the Social Self

Mead’s theory of symbolic interactionism has had a profound impact on sociology and psychology, particularly in understanding how individuals develop a sense of self within their social context.

Incorporating Mead’s ideas into research has allowed scholars to explore various aspects related to identity formation, socialization, and the influence of culture on the individual. His theory emphasizes the importance of language, social interaction, and role-taking in shaping our understanding of ourselves and our place in society.

Conclusion

George Mead’s theory of symbolic interactionism provides valuable insights into the formation of the social self. By emphasizing the role of language, social interaction, and role-taking, Mead highlights how individuals develop a sense of self through their interactions with others.

Understanding the social self is crucial for comprehending human behavior, relationships, and societal dynamics. Mead’s theory continues to be influential in shaping our understanding of these complex phenomena.