Behaviourism and Cognitive Psychology are two of the most fundamental branches of modern psychology. Though they both deal with the study of behavior and mental processes, they differ in their approaches, theories, and methodologies.

Behaviourism, as the name suggests, primarily deals with observable behavior. It originated in the early 20th century when psychologists like John Watson and B.F. Skinner proposed that behavior could be studied scientifically by analyzing the stimulus-response patterns. They believed that all human behavior could be explained by environmental factors such as rewards and punishments.

On the other hand, Cognitive Psychology focuses on mental processes such as perception, attention, memory, problem-solving, and decision-making. It emerged as a response to the limitations of Behaviorism and proposed that internal mental processes also play a crucial role in determining behavior.

Now coming back to our main question- Is Behaviourism Part of Cognitive Psychology? The answer is both yes and no.

On one hand, Behaviorism can be considered a part of Cognitive Psychology because it provides valuable insights into how external factors influence our mental processes. For instance, Conditioning theories like Operant Conditioning have been widely used to explain how reinforcement can shape behavior over time. Additionally, Behavioral Therapy is still a popular form of treatment for various psychological disorders such as phobias and addictions.

However, it’s also important to note that Cognitive Psychology has evolved beyond Behaviorism into several other subfields such as Information Processing Theory, Social Cognition Theory, and Connectionist Models. These theories emphasize the importance of internal mental processing in determining behavior rather than just external factors.

Therefore while Behaviorism may have played an essential role in shaping Cognitive Psychology’s early years; it’s not entirely accurate to consider it a part of modern-day Cognitive Psychology.

In conclusion,
Behaviorism was one of the first approaches to study human behavior scientifically by analyzing observable stimuli-responses patterns. In contrast,Cognitive Psychology emphasizes the importance of internal mental processing in determining behavior. Though Behaviorism can be considered a part of Cognitive Psychology because it provides valuable insights into how external factors influence our mental processes, it’s not entirely accurate to consider it a part of modern-day Cognitive Psychology, which has evolved beyond Behaviorism into several other subfields.