How Do You Understand Phenomenology?

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Diego Sanchez

Phenomenology is a branch of philosophy that aims to study and describe the structures of subjective experience. It was founded by the German philosopher Edmund Husserl in the early 20th century and has since become an important methodological tool for various fields such as psychology, sociology, and anthropology. In this article, we will explore what phenomenology is, how it works, and its significance in contemporary thought.

What is Phenomenology?

Phenomenology is a philosophical approach that seeks to understand subjective experiences as they are lived by individuals. It is concerned with describing the essential structures of these experiences without reducing them to objective or scientific categories. According to phenomenologists, our experiences are not just random collections of sensations but meaningful wholes that reveal something about ourselves and the world we live in.

The Method of Phenomenology

The method of phenomenology involves a process called “bracketing” or “epoch√©,” which means suspending one’s assumptions about the world and focusing solely on the experience itself. By doing this, one can describe the pure essence of experience without being influenced by preconceived notions or external factors.

Phenomenologists also use a technique called “intentional analysis,” which involves examining how our experiences are directed towards objects or entities in the world. For example, when we see a tree, we don’t just see a collection of leaves and branches but an entire object with meaning and significance. By analyzing these intentional structures, phenomenologists can uncover deeper insights into how we perceive and interact with the world around us.

Applications of Phenomenology

Phenomenology has been applied in various fields such as psychology, where it has been used to study consciousness and mental illness. In sociology and anthropology, it has been used to understand cultural practices and social norms from an insider’s perspective.

In addition, phenomenology has also influenced contemporary art and literature. Many artists and writers have used phenomenology to explore the subjective experience of their audiences and create works that challenge traditional ways of seeing and thinking.

Conclusion

Phenomenology is a philosophical approach that seeks to understand subjective experiences as they are lived by individuals. It involves a method of bracketing assumptions and analyzing intentional structures to uncover deeper insights into how we perceive and interact with the world around us. Its applications are diverse, ranging from psychology to art, and it continues to be an important tool for understanding human experience in contemporary thought.