Music theory is a fascinating subject that can be both complex and rewarding. One of the essential components of music theory is suspension.

Suspension refers to a specific type of chord progression that creates tension and release in music. In this article, we will explore what suspension is and how to find it in music theory.

What is Suspension in Music Theory?

Suspension occurs when a note from one chord is held over into the next chord, creating dissonance and tension. The suspended note then resolves down to a consonant note in the following chord, releasing the tension created by the suspension. This creates a sense of movement in music that can be used to great effect.

How to Find Suspension in Music Theory

Finding suspension in music theory requires an understanding of how chords are constructed and how they relate to one another. Typically, suspension occurs when the fourth scale degree is played over a dominant seventh chord.

For example, let’s say we have a C7 chord (C E G Bb). The fourth scale degree of C major is F, so if we play an F over the C7 chord, we create a suspension. This creates dissonance because F clashes with Bb, which is part of the C7 chord.

The suspended note (in this case, F) then resolves down to a consonant note (in this case, E) in the following chord. This creates a sense of resolution and release.

Types of Suspensions

There are different types of suspensions that can be used in music theory:

Examples of Suspension in Music Theory

Suspension can be found in all kinds of music, from classical to pop. Here are a few examples:

Conclusion

Suspension is an essential component of music theory that creates tension and release in music. Finding suspension requires an understanding of how chords are constructed and how they relate to one another.

There are different types of suspensions that can be used, and they can be found in all kinds of music. By incorporating suspension into your music, you can create a sense of movement and add interest to your compositions.