Social Control Theory is a sociological theory that explains how society regulates the behavior of individuals. According to this theory, social control refers to the mechanisms that prevent individuals from deviating from socially accepted norms and values. In other words, social control theory posits that people obey rules and laws because they fear the consequences of breaking them.

Origins Of Social Control Theory

Social Control Theory originated in the early 1900s with the work of sociologist Emile Durkheim. Durkheim believed that society was held together by a set of shared values and beliefs, which he called “social facts.” He argued that these social facts created a sense of moral obligation among individuals to follow certain rules and norms.

The Key Elements Of Social Control Theory

Social Control Theory has three key elements: attachment, commitment, and involvement.

Critiques Of Social Control Theory

While Social Control Theory has been influential in explaining why people obey rules and laws, it has also been criticized for ignoring the role of power in society. Critics argue that the theory fails to account for how social inequalities and power imbalances can lead to some groups having more control over others.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Social Control Theory is a sociological theory that explains how society regulates the behavior of individuals. It posits that people obey rules and laws because they fear the consequences of breaking them.

The theory has three key elements: attachment, commitment, and involvement. While it has been influential in explaining why people obey rules and laws, it has also been criticized for ignoring the role of power in society.