Music theory is a vast subject that includes many different topics and concepts. One such concept is suspensions.

Suspensions are an essential part of music theory, and understanding how they work can help you become a better musician. In this article, we will explore what suspensions are, how they work, and how to use them effectively in your music compositions.

What are Suspensions?

A suspension is a musical device that involves holding one or more notes from the previous chord over into the next chord. The held notes create dissonance with the new chord until they resolve to consonant notes. The dissonance creates tension, which is then released when the suspended notes resolve to consonant notes.

How Do Suspensions Work?

The basic idea behind suspensions is to hold one or more notes from the previous chord over into the next chord. These held notes create dissonance with the new chord until they resolve to consonant notes.

For example, let’s say you have a C major chord followed by a G major chord in a progression. If you hold the E note from the C major chord over into the G major chord while playing G, B, D (the G major triad), you will create a suspension. The E note creates dissonance with the G major triad until it resolves to F# (the third of G major).

The Different Types of Suspensions

There are several types of suspensions that you can use in your music compositions:

Using Suspensions in Your Music Compositions

Using suspensions in your music compositions can add depth and complexity to your music. Here are some tips on how to use suspensions effectively:

In Conclusion

Suspensions are an essential part of music theory, and understanding how they work can help you become a better musician. By holding one or more notes from the previous chord over into the next chord, you create dissonance, which creates tension in your music.

When the suspended notes resolve to consonant notes, that tension is released. Use suspensions sparingly, create tension with them, and use different types of suspensions to keep your compositions interesting and engaging.